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Adnan Siddiqi

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Flash for C++ and Java programmers

This seems a solid response by Adobe guys to Silverlight people. Adobe has decided to give support of C++,Java and Python for new releases of Flash environment.

 

Expanding on the project, Ted Patrick, Adobe technical evangelist, said the technology would allow for cross-compiling existing code from C, C++, Java, Python, and Ruby to ActionScript. This would enable components written in those languages to be integrated into a larger project, Patrick said. "That code becomes perfectly portable into our application platform," he said.

For example, an alternative PDF renderer providing a lighter version of PDF could be cross-compiled, and the Flash Player could read it and display PDFs.

 

Posted: Friday, February 29, 2008 1:39 AM by kadnan

Comments

khurram said:

Its a great move...

But who will write apps in Flash/Flex in Java/Python/C++ when it will only be for "Flash Player". Silverlight 2 apps can be compiled for desktop (WPFE is subset of WPF).

With Silverlight theoretically same code base can be (re)used in desktop apps...Even with Java/Python etc support; you will only have re usability up to business layer...UI layer will not be portable....

I am kinda biased, as I dont want to learn yet another class library...

# February 29, 2008 1:53 PM

kadnan said:

Khurram I don't understand how writing flas apps in non-Actionscript applications means writing new class library? A person like me who has not written a line in AS will feel much better to write code in Java or C then AS.

SL is new technology and can't be compared with Flash which runs on 90% of world browsers. By providing channels to write code in non-AS languages, Adobe has done an awesome job to make Flash accessible for developers.

as far as Desktop is concerned, Adobe has already released AIR and I can guess that later they will combine both AIR and Flash in single application.

# February 29, 2008 6:19 PM

Zahid said:

<quote>

But who will write apps in Flash/Flex in Java/Python/C++ when it will only be for "Flash Player". Silverlight 2 apps can be compiled for desktop (WPFE is subset of WPF).

With Silverlight theoretically same code base can be (re)used in desktop apps...Even with Java/Python etc support; you will only have re usability up to business layer...UI layer will not be portable....

</quote>

Ah, Microsoft crowd is so ignorant and how they hard they come at you with their baseless arguments. Harvard President once said "If you think education is expensive try ignorance" and I think this quote can be easily tailored to describe religious affiliation of people with Microsoft technologies.

# February 29, 2008 7:59 PM

khurram said:

By learning new libraries I meant...understanding UI control libraries their class structures and programming style...

Silverlight UI is WPF subset...Anyone working with WPF (.NET 3 onwards) already know many things, he doesnt have to learn new controls. Similarly the same subset of .NET BCL (Base Class Library) is available in Silverlight 2; you dont have to learn how to do file handling, database connectivity or call web services.

# March 1, 2008 3:24 PM

khurram said:

I am not ignorant about Flash...I have used it when they introduced Action Script for the first time...I used when they launched MX...I used it when they introduced Java and .NET server side support...I used it when they released Flex 1...I used it when Flex 2 was introduced....I am going to use it now as well...I have even made blog posts on Flash (http://weblogs.com.pk/khurram)......I havnt used Silverlight though...as my co team workers are not yet impressed...

Now Zahid, please back your argument with some solid points which made you think I am ignorant? Someone said, there are two types of people; those who realized whats the mainstream and join the party....and those who dont...

# March 1, 2008 5:13 PM

Zahid said:

There you go!

I'm not in it for an argument, but I respect you for couple of reasons that are quite self-explanatory. Now as for backing my arguments, well, my dear I can give you plenty but that would be futile. If you are an uber-technology enthusiast yourself( which you are claiming) then you can easily weigh in on the options. I didn't mean to disrespect you and neither Microsoft technologies. Microsoft has certainly done some good to developer community but they've done more harm. Again I'm not in it for an argument, but if you really know the prowess of some *other* languages & tools then Microsoft tools don't stand a chance. Are the improving? Yes. They have great language architects and Microsoft is certainly pushing things faster than Sun, apparently. I can give you loads of references from ex-MSFTees and amount of desperation felt in MSFT offices. Bottom line: I can give you plenty but don't have time for that.

That being said, please don't take this personally. I take this as a general technology debate with healthy consequences. I really apologize if something offended you (i.e. you not the Microsoft OR people singing their enchilada).

Adnan, thanks for the post and I really apologize for creating noise on your blog.

# March 2, 2008 5:18 AM

kadnan said:

Zahid,

Rights of this blog readers are not lesser than mine that is, you have 100% freedom to say whatever you want.

as far as old M$ vs non-M$ is concerned, I have seen them plenty on forums like Slashdot and in the end I find no result at all. I myself is not inclined towards Microsoft but then I believe in "right tool for the right job". I literally despise IE but then I love Microsoft's "LIVE WRITER" editor for blogging which have made my life a lot easier and managed. One likes or not but Microsoft's Development IDEs are quite friendly and other editors like Eclipse,NetBeans or even KDevelop of KDE have copied lots of things from Visual Studio environment. Fine I agree that VC6 compiler was pretty mess and not upto c++ standards but here I am talking about tools they have given to developers. In short Microsoft's tool are both blessing and curse for developer community.

# March 2, 2008 11:34 AM
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